Gig Review: Taco Hell, Kermes, Coffee Breath and Phaedra’s Love @ the Sunflower Lounge, Birmingham (04/01/18)

Posted: January 28, 2018 in Liveage

taco hell sfl

A gig review, we haven’t done one of those in a while! This was a bloody good one as well, albeit bittersweet: Taco Hell’s penultimate show as a band. The indie sad-punx were on their final tour after just releasing their debut LP, the brilliant, gritty and earworm-y Bad at Being Average. This gig was taking place at one of my favourite venues in the UK: the Sunflower Lounge in Birmingham, a basement that was made for shows like these. Ok, so let’s rewind to the beginning of the night…

So, first up was Exeter’s Phaedra’s Love, the project of Jordan White, formerly of Splitsville. I believe that Phaedra’s Love only really started last year, with a debut EP (‘Let Me Think This Way’ on Circle House records) released at the tail end of 2017. This was my first time listening to them. Jordan’s recorded stuff is solo, but he played here with a full band and it gave a very different feeling to the much more intimate and raw material on the EP. I wasn’t mind-blown by the set (and admittedly missed half of it), but I was certainly intrigued to go and listen to more after the gig (which I actually did- yay, go me!). Jordan plays heartfelt and raw, indie, emo-tinged punk, I guess; I often ask two things about a band I listen to: (1) does it make me tap my feet? and (2) does it come from the heart? Phaedra’s Love certainly ticks both of these boxes. Worth checking out.

Coffee Breath was up next, a local, Birmingham-based indie-emo band, who, according to their band profile, have “a mutual love of coffee”. Their set was certainly energetic, I’ll give them that. I knew them already from their ‘Lose Interest in This’ EP. While enjoyable, I feel that it’s live where Coffee Breath really shine. They played a kind of twinkly and math-y American Football-esque indie-emo that is at once intense and spacious. They have that quiet-loud thing going on that so many bands did in the late ‘90s/early ‘00s. As well as this, the guitars kind of swirl around, developing a kind of daydream state among the gig-goers. I think you either ‘get’ this sound or you feel it is contrived and silly; I am definitely in the former camp.

Next up on the bill was Leicester’s Kermes. Another band I wasn’t familiar with at all prior to the gig, but they are a great ball of fun. I’m not too sure how to describe them: indie punk, screampop? There is certainly an abundance of melodies going on, as well as an aggressive punk attitude, but it’s not really pop-punk either. They have the bombast, fierce spirit and groove of bands like Pixies, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and The Julie Ruin. Whatever it is, it’s pretty cool: Kermes are theatrical and wouldn’t look out of place in an arena, but at the same time, are grounded in everyday gender politics.

So, up last, Nottingham’s Taco Hell with their second-to-last ever show. Argh! It’s the first time I had seen them live and, boy, do I regret that now. They were alright. No, wait, they were fucking great! With intensity and a gritty DIY punk feel throughout, but with a ton of melodies and boy-girl dual vocals thrown in, I was pretty captivated. Taco Hell played their latest record Bad at Being Average from front-to-back at break-neck speed, with album highlights “Same City” and “Twin Peaks References & Depression” sing-a-long, crunchy and hook-filled. A few oldies come in at the end, notably ending on the self-deprecating, fan favourite “Hold the Door”. Bittersweet? Ended too soon? Yep and yep, but at least it was sweet and at least it began.

DB

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